PEPID

Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Vol 2(3) 2005: “PEPID seeks to integrate the universe of all information necessary for point-of-care, including drug information, for specific clinicians—whether they are emergency room doctors or oncology nurses.” -Marie K. Saimbert, RN, BSN, RPh, MLS

Skokie, IL. September 15, 2005--PEPID LLC-the world’s leading developer of medical information and support tools-once again proves its worth in the healthcare community according to one independent reviewer in this 2-part review published today in this prestigious medical library journal. Part one describes the comprehensive PEPID RN product that is becoming the leading resource for practicing and training RNs and Part two compares PEPID’s drug database (PDC) against contender Epocrates, labeling PEPID PDC “number one among clinicians”.

Part one is described here while part two is described in another release (see “PEPID PDC the Database of the Future”).

Marie K. Saimbert, Information & Education Librarian for the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, recently reviewed PEPID RN for the Journal of Electronic Sources in Medical Libraries.

Her review described the origin of the PEPID suite of products with specialized, targeted databases for physicians and nurses. The physician-oriented software including specialized suites for emergency physicians, primary care physicians, medical students and residents. The nursing-oriented software including specialized suites for practicing RNs, critical care nurses, oncology nurses and a new suite for student nurses. Each suite fully integrated with a drug database that was very favorable reviewed in Part 2 of her review.

Saimbert then reviewed the functionality of each aspect of the PEPID RN suite. She mentioned that suites are available on all PDAs (Palm or Pocket PC) and also online and recommended that new users review the prominent “How to Use PEPID” help section. She described the navigation aids such as the scrolling Index/Search functionality and the “Quicklink” pop-up menus that allow the user to drill down to specific information.

Saimbert goes on to write, “Nursing students and nurses will also appreciate some sections under the ‘General Nursing’ heading. There is a carefully constructed assessment section, which includes a very comprehensive physical exam segment. Practice pearls pepper the assessment section.” Procedures are also detailed.

Saimbert also points to the “System and Specialty Nursing” section “where numerous conditions are outlined, complete with nursing considerations” as one of the many ways PEPID strives to maintain a nursing focus.

Additional features that were described include hundreds of useful medical and drug calculators (including drug-dosing and drip-rate calculators), an Emergency Nursing section with nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and even chapters on wellness and complementary medicine.

“It’s always a good feeling to be recognized for what you do,” says Dr Mark Rosenbloom, CEO and founder of PEPID. “I’ve built our products around the concerns of healthcare professionals who make hard choices everyday, the people putting on the scrubs, seeing patients, turning symptoms into solutions. A review like this one confirms that PEPID is still on target.”

In her conclusion, Saimbert writes that “PEPID seeks to integrate the universe of all information for point-of-care,” while she notes that competitors have only recently understood the need for one point-of-care product.

“We have set the standard,” says John Wagner, President of PEPID. “It is our goal to maintain that standard by never losing touch with the concerns of the healthcare community.”

The review in its entirety may be found at: Haworth Press Article

Or contact PEPID at www.pepid.com for a copy of the review.